MechMate CNC Router Forum

Go Back   MechMate CNC Router Forum > Personal Build Histories > MechMates already cutting
Register Options Profile Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 19:08
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Cutting quiexxxxx nevermind #104 - Kansas USA

Looking forward to building my MechMate! I'm a avid woodworker and a passable welder with a son who welds like a madman. Looks like sonny has some welding to do.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 19:28
MetalHead
Just call me: Mike
 
Columbiana AL
United States of America
Welcome to the group !! Looking forward to your build.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 20:18
riesvantwisk
Just call me: Ries #46
 
Quito
Ecuador
Send a message via MSN to riesvantwisk Send a message via Skype™ to riesvantwisk
Welcome to the group Jim!

Browse the forum, read the PDF's, browse the forum, read the PDF's ask question... read.... you will have some fun there with your son.

Ries
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old Mon 08 March 2010, 04:52
Felton
Just call me: john
 
newark de
United States of America
hi welcome to the forum.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old Mon 08 March 2010, 19:51
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Thanks to everyone for the encouragement.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Mon 08 March 2010, 20:11
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Sighting the line - Kansas USA

I started on my control box. I also received my laser cut parts and have machined some parts on my Logan 10" lathe. I purchased a gear blank and intend to try my luck at cutting gears out of it. I have attached a few pics...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg _DSC8819.JPG (64.1 KB, 1862 views)
File Type: jpg _DSC8821.JPG (69.4 KB, 1862 views)
File Type: jpg _DSC8822.JPG (68.0 KB, 1863 views)
File Type: jpg _DSC8823.JPG (84.9 KB, 1861 views)
File Type: jpg _DSC8824.JPG (47.6 KB, 1861 views)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Mon 08 March 2010, 20:54
Drad98_98
Just call me: Dave #52
 
Fort Ripley, MN
United States of America
Good luck Jim, I just finished mine, had a great time building it. There is a wealth of infomation and very knowledgable people on here that will help in a minutes notice, it is what made my build so enjoyable.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old Mon 08 March 2010, 22:50
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Jim, is that a South Bend lathe?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old Tue 09 March 2010, 04:24
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
No, it is a Logan 10" toolroom lathe. It's on the small side but I still find plenty of uses for it.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old Tue 09 March 2010, 06:16
MetalHead
Just call me: Mike
 
Columbiana AL
United States of America
That is a sweet lathe. Did you restore it? Or was it that cherry when you bought it?

I am currently looking for a nice lathe, but I want a larger one. I have a 10x22 Grizzly that has worked great for what I paid for it.

I just want to work heavier material and these Logan and South Bend machines are a good buy if you learn what to look for when you buy one.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old Tue 09 March 2010, 17:16
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Yes, I did a total teardown and restore when I first got it. Nobody told me about the fact that quality tooling costs many times the cost of the lathe. I might not have one if I knew ahead of time.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old Tue 09 March 2010, 17:18
Regnar
Just call me: Russell #69
 
Mobile, Alabama
United States of America
Jim we have a 10x54 Clausing Lathe at work and I bet it has never chucked up anything over 10 inches. If you did the restore you it turned out great. I am almost finished rebuilding a old Bridgeport Round Ram. I am just waiting on the motor to get rewound.

What is your plan on chucking up the gear stock?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old Tue 09 March 2010, 17:56
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Haven't thought about it much. I have a 6" 6 jaw that might work if I use some shim stock. Or maybe just center it up in my 4 jaw. Do you have any ideas?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old Wed 10 March 2010, 20:23
JLFIN
Just call me: Jim
 
glenwood iowa
United States of America
Jim,
welcome and good luck
bit of advice for ya, 4 jaw will work to dial that blank in, take some old copper wire and strip it back about the length of ea. jaw and slide that baby down the teeth and chuck away. 3 or 6 jaw wont hold it concentric because of the 20 teeth on blank.
another way is to bore out a heavy walled pipe, slit lengthwise then chuck back up on it
carefully bore to the dia. of blank, when you release it should let you slide the blank in to the sleeve and you should run centered( mark the jaw of the chuck and the sleeve with marker so you can return to the same place in the chuck) kinda wordy for me
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old Wed 10 March 2010, 20:35
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Jim
Thanks for the ideas. I am going to try the wire method and see how close I can get to concentric. I used the slit/collar method to cutoff the excentric bushings so I may end up doing it that way if the wire method does not work good enough.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old Wed 10 March 2010, 20:40
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Jim
Are you building a MM?
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 05:10
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Anyone have a US source for the c channel washers shown in this thread on the second page most of the way down?

http://mechmate.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1385&page=2
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 05:25
OBXCNC
Just call me: RC
 
Key West
United States of America
McMaster-Carr has the washers

http://www.mcmaster.com/#washers/=664vff
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 05:37
MetalHead
Just call me: Mike
 
Columbiana AL
United States of America
Jim - Most folks make these. You can drill holes in the wing of a c-channel drop then use your grinder to cut them out. Turn them around and you have a washer that matches your channel.

http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showt...7&postcount=32
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 10:20
JLFIN
Just call me: Jim
 
glenwood iowa
United States of America
Jim- I have not started mine yet, I'm still in the procrastination stage.(design stage)
I've logged about 200 hrs of thread reading and decided I'm not to smart!!!! There are some folks on here that are. Speaking of design, I'm considering the use of ball screws, possibly one on each side for x-axis, driven by one motor located in the center, with timing belts to each side, driven by a 3 or 4 to 1 reduction, can I have feedback on why that won't work, also I really liked the builds done with I-Beams, seams a little stouter to me.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 10:43
JLFIN
Just call me: Jim
 
glenwood iowa
United States of America
Russel, is that old mill called a "M" head, I think I owned one once upon a time but it seams to me the collets were hard to come by?(not R-8)
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 18:20
Regnar
Just call me: Russell #69
 
Mobile, Alabama
United States of America
Jim it is a M-head with a MT2 tooling. Not hard to come by but not as easy as R8 or new collet systems.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 18:52
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Jim
The first thing that comes to mind is cost. Ball screws aren't cheap. I also think you will have pretty long timing belts which will have to be pretty tight due to their lenght. You will also lose the flexability that two motor drives gives you. Timing two ballscrews vs simple adjustments in Mach3. I'm thinking the mechmate design is solid as is, that is why I am sticking pretty close to plan when it comes to drive arrangements.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 20:49
JLFIN
Just call me: Jim
 
glenwood iowa
United States of America
russell, seams to me mine(which i dont think i ran) had a 3 pc split collet thing that went together inside of the locking nut, but it's been alot of yrs. good luck with that build i am sure you will enjoy it.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 21:09
JLFIN
Just call me: Jim
 
glenwood iowa
United States of America
Jim, I'll be honest, I don't know the mach control at all, but if that were the issue a guy could put a motor on both ends. the prices i've seen on some of these links tells me that ball screws aren't as pricey as they used to be and i don't think they need to be huge (.75 or .875) but I agree, can you syncronize the ball screws? The length of the timing belts would only be about 26 inches
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old Thu 11 March 2010, 22:32
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Cheap ballscrews have cheap seals and they jam up after being exposed to lots of dust.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old Fri 12 March 2010, 01:00
oopz
Just call me: oopz
 
Stockholm
Sweden
In addition to Geralds comment above. Would You Might Need a SPINNING - NUT due to the length of the screw in the X axis (even Y if you ask me). Due to there is a high risk of that the ballscrew begins to wobble. That - and reconstruct the design (or buy a spinning nut) takes both more time and costs significantly more $ $ $. Thats my opinion (and experience) in order to obtain the same reliability in design as MM has.

For what it's worth do other DIY hardware / designers pursue to use the R & P.
In there later creations, so it seams as its cost effective..And if anything happens, it is very easy to repair to a low cost. For me was MM's use of the R & P a strong advantage.

Hope it helped you..!

/oopz
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old Mon 15 March 2010, 20:55
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
New Guy from Kansas

Managed to get a little shop time in this weekend and was able to get the pinion gears cut down. Need to drill and tap for the set screws next. I plan to use two set screws 90 degrees apart. Anyone else used this approach?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg _DSC8826.jpg (65.7 KB, 1692 views)
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old Mon 15 March 2010, 21:03
JamesJ
Just call me: Jim #104 (retired)
 
Kansas
United States of America
Jim
BTW, the wire method worked great. I was able to indicate the gear blank down to 2 tenths before boring for the shaft. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old Mon 15 March 2010, 22:09
DeadGuy
Just call me: Dennis #51
 
Astoria, Oregon
United States of America
Hi Jim,

One question, where did you get the gear blank?

Dennis
Reply With Quote
Reply

Register Options Profile Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
It is CUTTING! Bolted Mechmate with linear bearings - Kansas, MO KevinL MechMates already cutting 53 Wed 22 May 2013 06:04
Hello from Kansas newmachinest Introduce yourself and start planning 4 Mon 27 September 2010 19:03
The Y-car is welded - Kansas City MO USA gooberdog Introduce yourself and start planning 19 Wed 02 June 2010 17:54
hi to all - Lenexa,Kansas, USA Rusty Harris Introduce yourself and start planning 6 Wed 17 June 2009 06:55


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:23.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.