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  #1  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 07:21
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
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Which spoil board cutter to choose from ?

Hi Guys….

Been searching for some info on spoil board cutter, question to be ahead/ready for when time come !
Many vendors to choose from, from my little search, but ! ?
Not sure what I should go for as far as either regular "shear" or “Upshear” ??
What is your suggestion, experience….I’d say upshear for a cleaner environenemt (easier for dust collector to pick up I assume….but….also, maybe to much dust in the router...or not !?!)

Any comment from experienced usage would be appreciated.
Amicalement, Robert

Gerald….Wasn’t sure where to insert this topic, here or at the “Cutting various materials - bit selection, feeds, speeds” ?? …Feel free to properly redirect it !...Thanks
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  #2  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 07:24
sailfl
Just call me: Nils #12
 
Winter Park, FL
United States of America
Robert,

Onsrud 91-000 cost about $33. It is cheap but it can be resharpened lots of times.

It is a good place to start.
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  #3  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 08:30
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
I don't think that the direction of shear makes a serious difference to the amount of of mess.
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  #4  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 08:30
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
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Thanks for your time to reply Nils…,
but my question is not about what's available, brands, type or other alternative than what I' questionning!!.
Amicalement, Robert
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  #5  
Old Thu 04 March 2010, 08:40
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
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Gerald, one thing I can imagine ( as I do lots of woodworking with conventional tools & machinery)
is a few things.
Say sor other purposes than surfacing, it is not recommended as it will “shear” edges if material if used as a partial surfacing. By partial, I mean leaving an edge(lip) not machined, say like using it as a “rabbeting tool” ( as we call it in woodworking) !
Defiantly not for solid wood machining, upshear wood fibers is a BIG no-no…

But…Say I ( and maybe some others too) still would like to acquire one upshear version, can one see a spindle and other usage disadvantage. Thinking, as an example, excess bust “in” the spindle….if ever !?!

Thanks, Robert
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  #6  
Old Sat 20 March 2010, 06:35
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
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Some update.
I’ve zero in on this type of spoilboard cutter, n° H-R2000 as I’m already a strong user of many insert cutter tools. For many reasons, I just like this concept.
If you look at the available list, they also have a 2.5”+0.15” and after asking, at no extra charge they can/will custom make a straight 2.5” without this +0.15’’, but the wait was +/- 4-6wks, so I opted for the straight 2” ….less money too !!
Interesting part is their “cutters bodies” screw to a threaded arbor. A kind of “quick change” as they call it.
It’s another economical, yet interesting & good quality alternative that without Normand Blais advising me to have a look at, I would not have remember about this Manufacturer !

Their prices are honest and some of the reason of why it is to some point less expensive, is not because of some missing quality or “cheep machining’’. It appears to me as it’s the principle behind it, the machining finishing of the tools them self is fine & adequate for what is it intended to be use for…. no fuss simple approach without the “glitzy & glare” like others and I suspect it to then finished with a simply black Nitriding. No paint finishing on it, crude industrial approach & well machined part. Simple, cost effective good quality parts to my opinion.

Amicalement, Robert
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  #7  
Old Sun 21 March 2010, 07:42
normand blais
Just call me: Normand
 
montreal
Canada
Salut Bob J'ai hate de rencontrer ta belle et ta bête. These cutter are realy noisy but I think all that turbulance help keeping them cool and sharp longer .I wonder if these 12mm insert are standard ,maybe they can be found localy.
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  #8  
Old Fri 26 March 2010, 19:53
Regnar
Just call me: Russell #69
 
Mobile, Alabama
United States of America
Robert thanks for the great link. I was wondering if through your research did you see anything on the max rpm of the tools.
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  #9  
Old Sat 27 March 2010, 05:45
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
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Russel, we also have to thank Norm for my “wake up call” !

RPM protection….Good point !
No, in this case, there is no “laser engraved marked” on the tool indicating the RPM range and had no time YET to E-mail to them for asking….
Although, whenever this happens, ( no recommended RPM range) I use a more conservative safety RPM table like this one.It is always a better practice to follow the manufacturer recommended range as there is a lots of variable out there as you can witness comparing this table vs the other one above I use.

Will ask the exact range from them and get back as soon as I receive news !
Amicalement, Robert
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  #10  
Old Sun 28 March 2010, 10:57
cab. guy
Just call me: Ron
 
Boise,Id.
United States of America
Robert,
I'm using Onsrud 2.5"insert straight cutter ,part 91-102 .feed speed f-200 to f-600
@12000-16000 rpm.This bit is rated to 18000 max.As advertised no mill marks,it looks and feels as it was sanded with 120 grit.Reality,its probably a little over kill,
but it looks damn nice.
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  #11  
Old Sun 28 March 2010, 13:09
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
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Ron….
I realize the Onsrud version had to be put aside when I saw that the HerSaf is also a 2wing insert type with what I consider an advantage.... it’s a screw type head, making it a semi-quick change type tool with other they also offer.

Another BIG advantage about HerSaf….. it’s almost 50% LESS than the Onsrud or other of it’s type !!??
Robert
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  #12  
Old Sun 28 March 2010, 14:12
cab. guy
Just call me: Ron
 
Boise,Id.
United States of America
Hey Robert, wasnt going to sell you on the Onsrud brand,thought you might be interested in the spec,as well as performance of the insert style,but now that you mension it, it was 40% off.
Cheers,Ron.
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  #13  
Old Wed 31 March 2010, 14:13
storenfwi
Just call me: Jordan
 
Louviers (CO)
United States of America
Hey all, I was reading through this thread and just had to comment that I use the 1 7/8" version, and I absolutely love it...in MDF. I can't speak to any other spoilboard material.
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  #14  
Old Wed 31 March 2010, 23:20
liaoh75
Just call me: David
 
Taibao
Taiwan
Jordan, when you say "I can't speak for any other spoilboard material" do you mean it doesn't work well in other material or you just haven't tried this bit in any other material? I'm thinking about using it to surface other things before carving. Can you do a test in some other solid wood and let us know if it is suitable as $113 isn't exactly "just to test" price range for me as far as cutters are concerned.
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  #15  
Old Thu 01 April 2010, 15:58
storenfwi
Just call me: Jordan
 
Louviers (CO)
United States of America
David,
Yeah, when I say I can't speak, I mean that I haven't tried it in other materials. Sorry about the confusion. I really only use it on my spoilboard. I will try it on some other materials though, ASAP, and let you know how it works out. I will say that the obvious caveat is that it must be trammed perfectly. For spoilboard surfacing, a few thousandths isn't a big deal in 2", but for surface finish work...so, we'll see when I try it on some maple, pine, and walnut!
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  #16  
Old Thu 01 April 2010, 23:34
liaoh75
Just call me: David
 
Taibao
Taiwan
Joradan, thanks for the clarification and I'll patiently await the results on the maple, pine, and walnut.
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  #17  
Old Tue 13 April 2010, 13:11
storenfwi
Just call me: Jordan
 
Louviers (CO)
United States of America
Finally surfaced!

Quote:
Originally Posted by liaoh75 View Post
Joradan, thanks for the clarification and I'll patiently await the results on the maple, pine, and walnut.
Sorry that it has taken me so long to surface with the Her-saf cutter. I tried it on a variety of woods, and would say that it gives a very passable finish. It is certainly not lacquer ready, but in my opinion it is about as close as you can get without spending MUCH more money on the cutter. If you don't mind a little bit of 220-320 grit sanding, it will work just fine.

Good luck if you choose to go with it, I know I've been very happy!

Jordan
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  #18  
Old Sun 21 August 2011, 15:07
giggler
Just call me: giggler
 
na
United Kingdom
about to surface MDF sacrificial wood to approx. 1mm deep but the cutters available this side of the pond (England) leave me a little lost.

I picked up this 3/4" straight cutter, however the cutting faces are best on the sides rather than bottom. Will this do? I can enter with this from the sides no problem, if you'd use it, what feeds would you expect? It's fine to say dump it and go looking for another

http://i55.tinypic.com/wt906b.jpg

thanks

dc
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  #19  
Old Sun 21 August 2011, 15:08
giggler
Just call me: giggler
 
na
United Kingdom
ooops, sorry thought i was posting a new thread.

dc
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  #20  
Old Sun 21 August 2011, 18:27
bradm
Just call me: Brad #10
 
Somerville(MA)
United States of America
That cutter should be fine as long as you don't plunge it into the material; actually, as long as you don't plunge more that those little tips and the outside, even a plunge would work; once you are scanning the table, it will be fine.

I would suggest you run it as fast as possible; at 1mm you ought to be able to go at the max rapid speed of the table. If you see imperfections in the result slow down a bit. Regardless, have good dust collection going, even if you have to hold a hose manually; it is incredible how much nasty dust gets created.
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  #21  
Old Sun 21 August 2011, 18:53
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
I still have MDF dust (inside) my road box from surfacing the table without dust collection. And its a HUGE roadbox. I'll never get it clean.
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