MechMate CNC Router Forum

Go Back   MechMate CNC Router Forum > Personal Build Histories > Construction started, but not cutting yet
Register Options Profile Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #151  
Old Sun 09 November 2014, 09:26
pblackburn
Just call me: Pete #98
 
South-Central Pennsylvania
United States of America
I can't say anything other than great idea. I did most of my build using various equipment I had access to (cnc and manual mills and lathes, heat treat processes, etc). That kept the cost down and improved the quality of the build. I would not say it is cheating but rather an appropriate use of resources.
Reply With Quote
  #152  
Old Wed 07 January 2015, 08:03
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Still here...

Got the steel for the Mechmate and one other project a while back. For a couple of reasons the "other" project actually took priority over the Mechmate, so I've been working on it and storing the Mechmate material. Thought some folks might be interested in the "other" project. (Have seen a few builders that were using their Mechmate to make aircraft parts) This is a rubber pad forming press. I put a few pictures in a Flickr album...several in progress photos and a computer rendering of the final result. Waiting on a shipment of high strength bolts then paint and set the bed in place on the hydraulic rams. Gonna be interesting !

https://www.flickr.com/photos/128567...7647813898144/
Reply With Quote
  #153  
Old Thu 08 January 2015, 06:52
IMMark
Just call me: Mark #119
 
Columbus Ohio
United States of America
Wow, looks awesome. I have seen, a much smaller scale version, and was impressed with the results. Please keep posting progress, would love to see that working.
Thanks
Mark
Reply With Quote
  #154  
Old Sun 22 February 2015, 09:47
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Big parts coming together

Finally got the other project out of the way and got started assembling the MechMate "kit" I had cut and punched earlier. After a couple hours of work, I got the baseplates and capplates for the posts welded on and temporarily bolted together. Starting to come together...










Reply With Quote
  #155  
Old Sun 22 February 2015, 11:37
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Interesting approach, are you going to do something similair to the sides with braces tot avoid racking?
Reply With Quote
  #156  
Old Sun 22 February 2015, 14:34
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
End to end the thing is already rock solid. Have diagonal tube braces to weld between the legs and the ends of the main beams with a cap plate to maintain the ability to break it down. The side to side direction is my only concern with the bolted connection between the legs and the cross channel. With the movement against a shear connection like that, it will be tough not to get some wiggle there. Am considering laying a bead of weld across the top and bottom of that joint knowing if it ever does need to come apart it will just be a quick cut with the side cutter to break it down.
Reply With Quote
  #157  
Old Mon 23 February 2015, 12:24
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
Send a message via Yahoo to Robert M Send a message via Skype™ to Robert M
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox View Post
Interesting approach
I'll second that
Looking forward seeing the advancement !
All the best
Reply With Quote
  #158  
Old Tue 03 March 2015, 16:18
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Test fit

Test fit the long angles to the main beams...surprise surprise...all the CNC punched holes lined up. Getting ready to cut them down to height and start the grinding. Got the diagonal braces welded in...they have a plate at the top to allow it to be broke down if the need ever arises.
Reply With Quote
  #159  
Old Mon 16 March 2015, 17:19
HomeMadeCnc
Just call me: Tim
 
Calgary, Alberta
Canada
Thats one beefy build!
Looking real good
Cheers
Tim
Reply With Quote
  #160  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 09:40
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Okay all you guys that have wired the Huanyang inverter. Am having a brainless moment and don't want to let the smoke out of the thing. When you wire a standard 220V-single phase in the U.S. you have 2 "hot" leads of 110v apiece (typically colored red and black) then a common or neutral (white) and then the ground (green)...well everything I've read says that to wire it 220V single phase I use the R,S and E terminals...from what I see on youtube videos and I few sources from varies companies that import them is black to R, white to S and green to E. Well that is missing a whole 110v leg? It isn't 220V?! I'm lost and am not afraid to admit it...I would be ashamed to admit I smoked the thing because I was afraid to say I was lost...but I digress...
Picture to follow...

Reply With Quote
  #161  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 13:11
Tom Ayres
Just call me: Tom #117
 
Bassett (VA)
United States of America
I looked at my set up and as far as I can see the R & T are the 2 legs the W is neutral and the Ground is green.
Reply With Quote
  #162  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 14:04
HomeMadeCnc
Just call me: Tim
 
Calgary, Alberta
Canada
Heres my basic setup
Incoming power on the left and spindle on the right
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Basic setup.jpg (206.3 KB, 405 views)
Reply With Quote
  #163  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 15:07
Tom Ayres
Just call me: Tom #117
 
Bassett (VA)
United States of America
oops, I guess i had better look at mine a bit better, all my wiring is black and numbered and didn't look at it correctly while hanging my head upside-down, sorry
Reply With Quote
  #164  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 15:34
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Tim, you being in Canada would be the same standard as the US, at least on being 110v based, as opposed to the UK and others that get 220v on 1 wire. For US/Canada to get 220v we have to use 2 110v legs. Now by colors you are attaching the ground to the R terminal...I thought the ground was supposed to tie to the pin 9? Are your colors off, or am I REALLY lost?
Reply With Quote
  #165  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 16:28
HomeMadeCnc
Just call me: Tim
 
Calgary, Alberta
Canada
Oh just a wee bit of custom wiring going on
Your correct .
I didn't have the correct color of wire so red it was.
I'm no expert, I still think its all PFM <--old aircraft term meaning Pure F--king Magic
Reply With Quote
  #166  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 19:18
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
I'm good with "custom" color codes (lol) what is attached to what though? Which is wired to the 110v leads and which is the common? (Does it matter?)
Reply With Quote
  #167  
Old Fri 20 March 2015, 21:17
HomeMadeCnc
Just call me: Tim
 
Calgary, Alberta
Canada
Miss read the question sorry, I already have a 220v feed in the shop. I had to split it to 2 circuits of 110 for the computer and outlets on the side of my machine.
As for your specific VFD hook ups I'll plead the 5th and ask you to refer to your owners manual. I'd hate to give you the wrong info and you having to deal with that black curl of smoke.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...2-x-110v-plugs

Last edited by HomeMadeCnc; Fri 20 March 2015 at 21:20..
Reply With Quote
  #168  
Old Sat 21 March 2015, 00:47
bradm
Just call me: Brad #10
 
Somerville(MA)
United States of America
Yikes! See this thread

In North American single phase, it's two hots (red, black), sometimes a neutral (white), and a ground (green). Between the two hots is 220V. Between any hot and the neutral is 110V.

Inverters are designed to output the same voltage that is input. They work by rectifying the input into DC, and then regenerating three phase output with variable frequency to control the motor speed. 220V spindle needs a VFD with 220V input.

Because of that rectifying step, inverters don't care if they have single phase or three phase input, as long as the amperage draw doesn't exceed the capacity of the rectifier, and there is sufficient capacitance designed in. In the single phase case, you are drawing all the amperage from two, not three wires, so the amperage is higher. It's usually only at the low end of the wattage range that inverters will support single phase input - it becomes too inefficient to carry large amounts of amperage on two wires as you move up higher.

So, you should be connecting black and red to R,S. T disconnected. white disconnected. Green to ground. U,V,W to spindle. You should measure 220V between the two legs you connect to R,S.

Now, it turns out that connecting white to T is kind of moot, because the input rectifier ignores it in favor of the higher voltage available between R and S. But it isn't correct.
Reply With Quote
  #169  
Old Sat 21 March 2015, 14:39
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Good info Brad...got a grip on it now. From what I've read, it does no harm to the spindle to do basic "yes it turns" testing without the water cooling hooked up...just talking about, yes we are turning and stop. Anyone actually done this or is that living dangerously?
Reply With Quote
  #170  
Old Sun 22 March 2015, 04:26
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
A short bench test with no water is fine.

(When I was in the auto industry, with a little dyno testing of car and truck engines, it was tempting fate to start an engine after filling it with water . . . . too often one had to open the engine and work with water everywhere)
Reply With Quote
  #171  
Old Sun 22 March 2015, 07:53
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Thanks Gerald...Will make it spin today, hopefully.
Reply With Quote
  #172  
Old Wed 14 October 2015, 08:56
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Somewhat "semi-related" to a Mechmate question...

Friend is a prolific model boat builder and ask me to machine a couple of plugs for fiberglass boat hull molds. Have years of 2D cad experience and years of 3D parametric modeling experience (specific to structural steel industry) but this is a different animal. I "think" I need to approach this from a 3D mesh direction but am open to suggestions if anyone is fluent with this. Have an older version of AutoCAD (2002) that does everything I ever need outside of my work 3D software...it has 3D capabilities (extrude 2D objects to 3D etc....). I've been watching some tutorials and have some ideas...the back half is actually easy to model...the bow area has me scratching my head. Example picture attached.

If I can generate a .stl file then importing into VCarve pro 8 and generating toolpath is a cakewalk...no trouble there.
Reply With Quote
  #173  
Old Wed 14 October 2015, 10:34
pblackburn
Just call me: Pete #98
 
South-Central Pennsylvania
United States of America
I will take a stab at trying to answer this, assuming I understood the question correctly.

If you are going to model it outside of Vcarve or Aspire then you will have to import in with one of their supported formats. I can tell you that it will import a rhino 3dm but as with most modelers the file will when opened with appear boxy and not smooth. That is the nature of how most cad programs save. They do not save as a mesh. So if you import a cylinder into VCARVE saved as a dxf or 3dm you will notice it will be more of a polygon than a smooth cylindrical surface. The only way I know to do it is as a mesh as you suggested. I don't know the software you are using but if it is Rhino, there is great information online on the best start points when using the Mesh command.
Reply With Quote
  #174  
Old Thu 15 October 2015, 04:35
Tom Ayres
Just call me: Tom #117
 
Bassett (VA)
United States of America
If you are copying the model above, you might be able to use a probe and 'plot' the image.
Reply With Quote
  #175  
Old Thu 15 October 2015, 07:46
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
Don't have aspire, and looking at the upgrade fee don't think I could justify the cost...That said, I think I can make it work in AutoCAD 2002...have been able to extrude some shapes along a curve (to model the bow area)...think some combination of extruded solids will actually do it.
This has been an interesting project already...learning something new always gets me excited! Always like a challenge!
Reply With Quote
  #176  
Old Fri 16 October 2015, 17:18
dbinokc
Just call me: DB #118
 
Oklahoma
United States of America
How did the person who made the mold create the shape. Was it hand carved or was some cad software used.
Reply With Quote
  #177  
Old Fri 16 October 2015, 18:43
1planeguy
Just call me: 1planeguy
 
Smiths, Al.
United States of America
My friend actually made the original plug using good 'ol tried and true sanding templates and jigs...hours and hours of sanding. He wants to jump up into another model boat race class and needs that plug enlarged 17%.
Reply With Quote
  #178  
Old Fri 16 October 2015, 19:38
dbinokc
Just call me: DB #118
 
Oklahoma
United States of America
I guess if I had a similar task things I might try in no particular order are

1. Touch off probe with my mechmate if the height were not too great
2. Touch off probe in my dro mill
3. If the sanding templates fit close, use those get 2d profiles
4. Contour gauge to get 2D profiles

To smooth things out once the points are in the software, I would try to find something that could generate 2D bezier surface from a mesh

I am just throwing ideas out there. Not sure what would be practical and what would not.
Reply With Quote
  #179  
Old Sat 17 October 2015, 07:12
spyderxxx
Just call me: Ed
 
Cambridge Ontario
Canada
What about Delftship free. It's a program used to design boats. Not sure if it exports STL files.
Reply With Quote
  #180  
Old Sat 17 October 2015, 23:04
pblackburn
Just call me: Pete #98
 
South-Central Pennsylvania
United States of America
You can bring point clouds into Rhino and it will create a surface from the points. That is another option.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Register Options Profile Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mechmate "Junior", table and gantry welded - Portland,OR Sherman McCoy Construction started, but not cutting yet 100 Wed 21 March 2018 06:40
Seating the Y Gantry on the X Rails - correcting a twisted gantry Greg J 20. Gantry 30 Wed 14 April 2010 03:55
Y Car Welded - France fawzikach Construction started, but not cutting yet 30 Wed 24 March 2010 16:15
Table welded, parts shopping going well - Dundee, MI GregA Construction started, but not cutting yet 111 Thu 07 February 2008 11:00
Programming a simple pushbutton control station for ShopBot Mike John Human Interface Devices (HID's) 25 Fri 11 January 2008 11:47


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:00.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.